ARUM Dayu

About The Artist

Indonesian artist Arum Dayu (b. 1984) began her creative career as a photojournalist for Kompas. She was educated at Sebelas Maret University and Ateneo de Manila University, and recently completed her MFA at Institut Teknologi Bandung. She is part of the Bandung-based artists’ collective and art space, Omnispace. Past exhibitions include the Jogja Biennale (2020); “#Perempuan” (Space 28 VCA, Melbourne, 2018); “Identity Crisis: Reflection on Public and Private Life in Contemporary Javanese Photography” (Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, New York, 2017). She also participated in residences at the Jatiwangi Art Factory, and at Cemeti, Yogyakarta.

ARUM Dayu

"Today, the hijab is no longer considered old-fashioned and conservative; its meaning has changed. It is not only a covering for the body, but is considered accessory, protection, safety, and a reflection of the wearer's status."

Novelty Vogue (1/8)

Novelty Vogue (1/8)

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Novelty Vogue (2/8)

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Novelty Vogue (3/8)

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Novelty Vogue (4/8)

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Novelty Vogue (5/8)

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Novelty Vogue (6/8)

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Novelty Vogue (7/8)

About The Artwork

Novelty Vogue

Digital image

Here, Arum Dayu takes on the shifting significance of the hijab in her native Indonesia. (The hijab is a term applied to the headscarves worn by Muslim women for purposes of modesty.) The growing number of Indonesian women who don the hijab in their daily lives has given rise to a segment of the fashion industry catering to this expanding market, with the country now one of the world's recognized centers of hijab fashion.The evolution of the hijab from an object prescribed by religious custom to one that is subject to the whims of sartorial trends is mirrored in the artist’s creations of hijabs for women in various occupations and walks of life. There is one for motorcycle taxi drivers, a mermaid-themed hijab inspired by Indonesian soap operas, one for gardening and one for sports, among others. She observes: “Today, the hijab is no longer considered old-fashioned and conservative; its meaning has changed. It is not only a covering for the body, but is considered accessory, protection, safety, and a reflection of the wearer's status. The hijab as a fashion statement is now present in the everyday activities of Muslim women in Indonesia.”

Julius Baer Next Generation Investment Theme

Shifting Lifestyles and Inequality