Nat SETTHANA

About The Artist

Nat Setthana (b. 1995) is a Thai visual artist who received his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees from King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi. His practice ranges from photography to the moving image and multimedia installation, and is a driven by an interest in the Thai historical context and its political movements. As technological advancement impacts how we visualize our world in a wired regime, the ambiguities of Thai democracy and the numerous political conflicts that have shaped it since the modernization of Siam in the nineteenth century has guided Setthana’s inquiry into state-sponsored power as it operates in everyday life.

Nat SETTHANA

"This inequality is... the result of the political structures that appear naturally as a part of everyday life, and the social practices that support the disparity are examined through the visual culture of death and its rituals. "

About The Artwork

Curatorial Relationship

Two-channel colour video with sound

Curatorial Relationship is a filmic essay that interrogates the relationship between the photograph, memory and history. Through the lens of funeral ceremonies, it focuses on how the modern Thai nation-state utilizes the photographic image and collective memory as political tools. The discourse of funeral portraits is ultimately about relationships, and the shift from personal memories to a public ceremony reflects state-sponsored power over individual experience. Here, the film explores the ways in which family photographs and intimate memories are used by the state as a political instrument: family photographs are read as alternate projections of historical memory, curated with a different form of narration to construct a visual essay that inquires into the relationship between personal recollection and collective histories, while simultaneously attempting to expose the relationship between the individual citizen-subject and the modern Thai nation-state, and the status quo that maintains the inequality between both that has become apparent in contemporary Thai political life. This inequality is, of course, the result of the political structures that appear naturally as a part of everyday life, and the social practices that support the disparity are examined through the visual culture of death and its rituals.

Julius Baer Next Generation Investment Theme

Shifting Lifestyles and Inequality