SYAURA Qotrunadha

About The Artist

Syaura Qotrunadha (b. 1992) lives and works in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Her mediums of choice include photography, video art and installation. Her work is chiefly engaged with music, history, and educational and political issues; she is currently working on projects involving forgotten histories, and the formal education system in Indonesia. Her works have been exhibited at “Biennale Jogja XIII: Hacking Conflict, Indonesia Meets Nigeria”, Jogja National Museum (2015); “Berdiam/Bertandang: Art for Refuge”, National Gallery of Indonesia (2018); “Cur(e)ating the Earth, Shifting the Centre”, Karya Normal Baru Online Exhibition (2020).

SYAURA Qotrunadha

"The process of making this work brought me to a new understanding about the roots of discrimination that continues to happen in Indonesia today, where identity-based discrimination is part of our daily lives, especially in Java."

The Fattest Land at the Fair. Video

The Fattest Land at the Fair. Video

About The Artwork

The Fattest Land at the Fair

Single-channel colour video with sound

Racial anthropology, a branch of Western pseudoscience, was common in the 19th century, particularly in colonised countries. Humans - especially those considered to be of inferior races - were measured and classified like plants, with corpses sometimes even removed from the grave to be included in museum displays. Theories of racial anthropology were widely utilized, and its impact still felt today in contemporary Indonesia. The Fattest Land at the Fair is a montage of archival material that is presented performatively, engaged with themes of migration, land, and its relation with the humans who inhabit it. The artist was inspired by archives of the practice of physical anthropology and studies such as F.H. Sijsling’s Racial Science and Human Diversity in Colonial Indonesia, and, as she notes, “the process of making this work brought me to a new understanding about the roots of discrimination that continues to happen in Indonesia today, where identity-based discrimination is part of our daily lives, especially in Java. Perhaps what needs to be questioned here are ideas of identity and purity, and whether what we consider wrong or backward could actually teach us something about ourselves.”

Julius Baer Next Generation Investment Theme

Shifting Lifestyles and Inequality